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What Linux Dist?

I have been using Redhat products since RH-5, and presently I'm on Fedora Core 6. However, I'm ready for a divorce from Redhat, as I cannot stand their update schedule. Bringing out a new version every 6 months is just ridiculous, and what is worse, anything more then two versions old gets deprecated....hence, no more updates.

I would like to have something that has at least a few years of updates/download support, and I would also prefer to stay with somthing RPM based, as I am most familiar with that. I generally convert all my compiled sources into RPMs at some point.

* I have been looking at Mandriva, and playing around with the LiveCD. It looks great. However, it has managed to lock up on me twice....not a good sign.

* I think OpenSuse is RPM based, but really don't care for Novell, which I believe controls the project. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

* I like Kubuntu, but hate that it's DEB based, and have had many problems with apt-get in earlier FC distrubitions. I also seemed to have problems making Kubuntu work well with my Nvidia card. I don't mind using the Nvidia proprietary drivers, but could not find them for Kubuntu.

What are your preferences for a good Linux Distribution?

Thanks,
Lexridge

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rncbc's picture

My distro of choice is openSUSE, which has survived the Novell buy out, or sort of. I've been a SuSE user since the 7.2 release -- yeah, before you ask, I've bought all the boxed versions since then; maybe skipped one or two of the 8.x ones :) And you ask why? Mainly two words: KDE and ALSA. Yes, SuSE was once the one if not the major sponsor of that couple of greatest open-source projects, that I tend to have as my bed of roses (along with the thorns too:)

Have you looked to PCLinuxOS, and to something radically distinct, Gentoo ?
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rncbc aka Rui Nuno Capela

PCLinuxOS is making strides in the audio arena. We now have a rt kernel with all the PCLos goodies included. This has been a long time coming and should accelerate PCLOS based audio projects. See www.rocxshop.com for one and PCLOS Producer Edition at www.mypclinuxos.com for another.

BTW - Thanks RNC for the wonderful apps! I'm the founder of RocXshoP and current maintainer for Qtractor (among a few others) at PCLOS and your stuff is a pleasure to work and play with!

rncbc's picture

Jaaxx,

Thanks for the support. I'll have to admit that I only had a couple of trials with PCLinuxOS a few months ago. I once used Mandrake (now née Mandriva) which I believe it's the PCLOS predecessor. What I praise about it is it's plain user experience orientation and having KDE as the preferred desktop environment, which is always a plus to me ;)

IIRC, what kept me back at the time was a lack of the development environment available OOTB. Setting up one would require a network connection and a reliable package repository, which I couldn't get right then or at least fast enough. I guess that might have changed, for the better now.

Anyway, I am glad that my apps are now build-able and runnable on PCLOS and someone is taking the lead. I recognize that RocXshoP is a very recent offering and for that I just wish you all the success and fun too.

Cheers.
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rncbc aka Rui Nuno Capela

How is openSUSE on "non-free" support, such as mp3, mpeg2, wmv, etc. Since Novell actually paid M$ for this stuff, how does this affect openSUSE?

Gentoo may be interesting. I once heard that is what the kernel developers are using.

Thanks,
Lexridge

rncbc's picture

AFAICS, the "non-free" support you're referring to (mp3, mpeg2, wmv, etc.) are a matter for some patent litigation issues, not necessarily covered by the MSFT-NOVL deal (except, maybe just maybe, wmv). What that means to you is... as US citizen, you are on your own. As I read it, Novell/SUSE, and any other US based distro for that matter, won't supply those products itself in their proper distribution, but it pours on you, the user, the liability to get it somewhere else at your own will, initiative and risk ;)

Ah, but IANAL :)
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rncbc aka Rui Nuno Capela

....but I'm very familiar with the patent issues. I guess what I was asking more or less was, can I get native "nonfree" packages for a given distribution for mp3, mpeg, bla bla bla without having to build it all? With Fedora, I can get all those non-free packages from Livna.org.

I don't think anyone is going to do anything about a user installing these non-free apps/libs. Until something has been proven in a US court, which nothing has, no Linux user is going to get arrested for it. However, pirating movies and mp3s will most certainly land folks a HEALTHY fine (mostly unfair fines, in many cases). I guess the MPAA/RIAA has more pull than the BSA (Business Software Alliance).

Some developments have come to light though, the courts are finally figuring out they are being used and bullied by the MPAA/RIAA, and are slapping them down by fining them for frivolous lawsuits and wasting the court's time.

Lexridge

rncbc's picture

Just to get it on par, and get my openSUSE cap on, the so-called Community Repositories have all the missing parts that you call non-free (and the rest too). Those repositories are readily accessible from any openSUSE post-installation, through YaST and thus also with the awesome 1-click install feature (which it's really nice, BTW).

For instance, I believe the one-stop solution for your spoken needs are the Packman repository.

By adding these repositories to your list you get all that you might need that isn't in the official shipped openSUSE distribution. There's also these Non-OSS repository where you get access to some commercial/proprietary/closed-source stuff, like flash, areader, etc. And all this under the opensuse.org umbrella, mirroring, and/or build services.

How's that?
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rncbc aka Rui Nuno Capela

Well, I downloaded the 4gb ISO today (v10.3). Backing off my computer shop machine now. I figure that would be a better machine to try it on, rather than my main home machine. Your words regarding openSUSE are refreshing, and making me less leary of using a Novell product. ;) More on this later.

Thanks,
Lexridge

PS......I love the new copy/move plugin feature in Qtractor's mixer!!! :) Very handy indeed, and a great idea too! ;)

rncbc's picture

I love the new copy/move plugin feature in Qtractor's mixer!!! :) Very handy indeed, and a great idea too! ;)
It was YOUR idea, wasn't it? It is me who should be thankful, and sure that I am :)

Cheers!
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rncbc aka Rui Nuno Capela

Rui!!
I thought that was our little secret..LOL. I wasn't going to tell anyone, but since you did.......oh well :))

The new move/copy is extremely helpful. Especially since we don't have Aux Buses yet. Once that happens, one can just assign the plugin(s) to an Aux bus, and send or route the channel(s) to that, using only one plugin instance (thus saving precious CPU cycles). Until then, this is godsend! :)

So far, I have used it tonight on a project I am working on with three tracks of backing vocals. I wanted the effects on the backing vocals to be the same for each one. It was great to just copy the plugin (with parameters intact) to the other backup vocal tracks. Sure, I could have saved the preset of the plugin and reloaded it on each instance, but this method is a a LOT quicker! :)

BTW, I got everything backed up on my computer shop machine, so Saturday it will get a fresh install of openSUSE 10.3. I'm actually looking forward to something different from Redhat.

Lexridge

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